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  • Local leaders gathered at the Clinton Country Club Thursday morning to hear about a planned program to get youth in the high school in business.
     
    The DeWitt County Development Council hosted Cheryl Mitchell (right) from the Midland Institute CEO Program. The program, Creating Entrepreneurial Opportunities, started in Effingham and is in 28 communities. Mitchell stresses it is a rural based program.
     
     
    Mitchell explains there is an exodus of youth in rural America because of the lack of opportunity. She says the CEO program is doing things the right way to help our communities to continue to evolve.
     
     
    According to Mitchell, the CEO program introduces youth to businesses and the opportunities in them. It also brings communities together.
     
     
    To make the program work, the program calls upon the community to take on students and work with them. There will be a Board of nine to 11 people that would be a working board in what are all a part of what she calls 'stakeholders'.
     
     
    Mitchell encouraged local leaders to visit classrooms and trade shows schools are hosting. 
     
    She adds they create students who are learners, owners, they give them experiences, teach them communication skills and about networking. She says if the community does not start this process now, it could be 2019 before the program could be up and running, though the hope is to get it going for the 2018 school year.
     
    If you're a business owner and would like to learn more about becoming involved, contact Clinton Schools Superintendent Curt Nettles for more details at 217-935-8321. 

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  • In a press conference yesterday addressing the health care vote, Representative Rodney Davis expressed that he felt the GOP bill had been thoroughly negotiated and was a good replacement for the Affordable Care Act.
     
    He stated that if the government does nothing, the state of Illinois will suffer financially.
     
     
    Senator Dick Durbin has been critical of the bill, while Davis calls the system that Durbin supports a "collapsing" one.
     
     
    Despite Davis' feelings, the bill was pulled and the vote canceled by Speaker of the House, Paul Ryan, after the bill failed to garner enough support from both sides of the aisle. CBSnews.com reported, "The health care vote has now been called off, after Republican leaders and the White House tried and failed to win sufficient support for the GOP legislation to undo Obamacare."

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  • The Boys and Girls Club around Illinois say a critical program may be cut if President Donald Trump’s proposed budget moves forward. 
     
    The budget item – the 21st Century Community Learning Centers – provides Illinois about $52 million a year in funding and a portion goes to the Boys and Girls Clubs sites that are located inside of schools.
     
    Central Illinois Boys and Girls Club Executive Director Bill Legee says if those locations go away student performance will suffer.
     
     
    The sites, located often located in schools, focus on having certified tutors to help students with afterschool homework, they provide a snack for the kids and a safe environment for them to be in while they often wait for a parent to come home from work. 

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  • The recipients of nearly $50,000 of scholarships to high school seniors throughout central and southern Illinois pursuing agriculture-related majors and future careers were announced last week by Farm Credit Illinois. FCI awarded 24 high school seniors a $2,000 agriculture scholarship; two are designated as Urban Agriculture Scholars.
     
    Clinton High School Senior Riley Donelson will graduate and attend Illinois Central College to study agricultural communications to work in communications for the livestock industry. 
     
    Her parents are Phil and Tanya Donelson.
     
    Sara Edgar of Gibson City Melvin Sibley High School in Ford County will graduate and attend Colorado State University to study agricultural business. She plans to work as an agricultural lawyer specializing in trade and policy. 
     
    Her parents are Scott Edgar of Gibson City and Stacy Deaton of St. Louis, Mo.
     
    Maddie Fugate of Mahomet-Seymour High School will graduate and attend Lake Land College to study agricultural communications and animal sciences. 
     
    She plans to be a lobbyist on Capitol Hill before running for political office. 
     
    Her parents are Eric and Julie Fugate.
     
    Samy Mackey will graduate from Centennial High School and attend Parkland College to study agricultural and biological engineering with plans to improve world-wide food production systems. 
     
    His parents are Andre Kabeya Mackey and Patricia Museba Mackey. 
     
    Mackey is an Urban Agriculture Scholar.
     
    This is the fourteenth year of the Farm Credit agriculture scholarship program which has awarded more than $340,000 to 299 students since 2004. Scholarship selections are based on a combination of academic achievement, participation and leadership in school and community organizations, and the applicant’s commitment to an agricultural career.

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  • It was a cold, wet week but a warm wet weekend is in store. State Climotologist Jim Angel has the details.
     

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  • One of college basketball’s most legendary coaches has Illinois roots. Adolph Rupp coached for over 40 years at the University of Kentucky. 
     
    His job before that—teacher and coach at a small high school in Stephenson County in Northern Illinois says Sports Director Brian Reusch at WCCI radio in in Savanna, Illinois.
     
     
    Rupp, a Kansas native, heard about the Kentucky opening through the University of Illinois basketball coach, who spoke at the Freeport basketball banquet in 1930. 
     
    Before Freeport, Rupp coached wrestling at small town Marshalltown, Iowa. 

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  • MARCH IS NATIONAL KIDNEY MONTH AND AN EXPERT AT THE UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS EXTENSION HAS SOME TIPS FOR PREVENTING KIDNEY STONES.
     
    KIDNEY STONES ARE PEBBLE-LIKE MINERAL DEPOSITS THAT CAN CAUSE QUITE A BIT OF PAIN UNTIL THEY PASS. THE BIGGEST RISK FACTOR FOR DEVELOPING THEM IS BEING DEHYDRATED SAYS U OF I EXTENSION NUTRITION AND WELLNESS EDUCATOR LISA PETERSON. SHE RECOMMENDS DRINKING 12 TO 16 CUPS OF FLUIDS A DAY…PREFERABLY WATER.
     
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    PETERSON SAYS REDUCING YOUR SALT INTAKE CAN ALSO HELP…AND RECOMMENDS NOT EATING TOO MUCH OF FOODS WITH HIGH LEVELS OF OXALATES. THAT INCLUDES PEANUTS, RHUBARB, SWEET POTATOES, CHOCOLATE AND SOY PRODUCTS.
     
    PETERSON SAYS TOO MUCH SODIUM IN YOUR DIET CAN ALSO LEAD TO KIDNEY STONES.

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